Jefferson Madison Center for Religions Liberty
 
Educating Americans about religious liberty as expressed
by founding fathers Thomas Jefferson and James Madison

 
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Help the JM Center by sending high resolution photos of your state's Eagles monuments
to Bob Ritter at the JM Center. Thank you.


F.O.E. Ten Commandment Monuments in West Virginia (4)

Follansbee, West Virginia
Follansbee, West Virginia
Photo: Eagle (F.O.E. magazine) December 1962
Follansbee, West Virginia
Follansbee City Park
Photo by Mayor David A. Velegol, Jr. (May 2016)

Donated by FOE: September 1962

Location: Follansbee City Park (between the Follansbee City Swimming Pool and Mark Avenue).

Scroll: “Presented To / The City Of Follansbee W VA / By / Fraternal Order Of Eagles / No. 1802 Follansbee W VA / September 1962”



Grafton, West Virginia
Grafton, West Virginia
International Mother’s Day Shrine (the church)
St. Andrews Methodist Episcopal Church
(Front of monument faces St. Andrews)
Screenshot: Google Maps street view Sept. 2013
Grafton, West Virginia
St. Andrews Methodist Episcopal Church (right side)
Screenshot: Google Maps street view Sept. 2013

Donated by FOE: May 9, 1965

Location: St. Andrews Methodist Episcopal Church, 11 E. Main St.

Scroll: “Presented In / Honor Of All Mothers / By W. Va. State / Auxiliary and Aerie / Fraternal Order of Eagles / May 9, 1965”

Notes: St. Andrews Methodist Episcopal Church was constructed in 1873. It is most noted for holding the first official celebration of Mother’s Day in 1908. The “mother church” of Mother’s Day, was incorporated as the International Mother’s Day Shrine on May 15, 1962, as a tribute to all mothers. The International Mother’s Day Shrine was designated a National Historic Landmark October 5, 1992. Source: Wikipedia available at International Mother’s Day Shrine.



Jackson’s Mill, West Virginia
Moundsville, West Virginia
“West Virginia Building”
Moundsville, West Virginia
Photo by Chad N. Proudfoot (May 2016)
Extension Historia & Archivist
& Historic Preservation Officer
Jackon’s Mill 4-H Camp

Donated by FOE:

Location: West Virginia Building, 160 WVU Jackson Mill, Weston (Lewis County), West Virginia. Visit jacksonsmill.ext.wvu.edu for more information.

Scroll: “Presented To / University Of West Virginia / By / West Virginia State Aerie / Fraternal Order Of Eagles”

Story: Jackson’s Mill was the boyhood home of Confederate General Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson from 1831 to 1842. It is now primarily used as a 4-H camp with dorms and cabins. The West Virginia Building was built for the Chicago World Fair in 1893. Every state had an exhibit of some kind. The house was so impressive that, instead of tearing it down, they decided to number each piece and rebuild it. Read Mrs. Orchard’s perosnal story about the West Virginia Building here. Jackson’s Mill and Jackson’s Mill State 4-H Camp Historic District are both listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

Note: Altho the scroll at the bottom of the monument says “University of West Virginia,” the correct name of the university is “West Virginia University.”

There is a hole at each of the corners at the scroll at the bottom. This suggests that a plaque was once mounted on the monument.



Moundsville, West Virginia
Moundsville, West Virginia
Central Elementary School
Screenshot: Google Maps street view October 2015

Donated by FOE: 1957

Location: Central Elementary School, 750 Tomlinson Ave., facing 7th St. Previously located in the playground.

Scroll: “Presented To / Marshall County School Board / By / Moundsville Aerie & Auxiliary No. 499 / Fraternal Order of Eagles / May 1957”